7 Awesome Free Comic Book Fonts for Commercial Use and How to Use Them

Featured image for comic lettering fonts

When done right – you tend not to notice great comic book lettering. Meaning it blends seamlessly with the art to make an amazing reading experience.

I used to letter all of the various comics that we created back in the mid-late 2000’s.

I’d pour a glass of wine (I’m not a wine drinker incidentally), fire up InDesign and get to it. It was a nice reprieve from writing, drawing, packaging, Myspacing and marketing our fledgling boutique comic publishing concern.

I wasn’t particularly great – but I was pretty good and lettered around 250 pages in total.


Hand Lettering Your Comic Was Sometimes Ulcer Inducing

Lettering your comic used to be a nerve-wracking experience. That is when you were talking about dropping in the lettering by hand with a technical pen or a #107 nib. While digital lettering today can still be a frustrating process it’s miles easier than in decades past.

comic hand lettering guide by Dale Martin

[image source]

Enter the comic book font.


Where the “Comic Book Font” Came From

When I was first hunting for free comic fonts to test out in the early 2000’s the pickings were slim. There were only two or three worthy contenders. Since then thousands of free fonts can be found and downloaded online. By sheer numbers, this also means more free quality comic fonts have also surfaced.

It just takes longer to find them now.

While I tend to stick with “paid for” Comicraft fonts you should play around with some of the free ones first to get a feel for comic lettering.

My goal for you with this post was three-fold.

  1. The fonts had to be free.
  2. They had to be able to be used commercially (or at least partially)
  3. They had to at least be “almost” as good as a paid commercial font.


Free Comic Lettering Fonts

Blambot Comic Fonts

My first stop was over at Blambot comic fonts and lettering. Nate Piekos has been at this for two decades and has lettered comics for Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Oni Press, Dark Horse Comics and many others. Nate’s work has been seen EVERYWHERE.

He’s designed a lot of comic fonts and has made several of them free via a license agreement for independent comic creation.

  • Anyone can use Blambot free fonts for non-profit projects, excluding Embedding, Redistribution, or Webfont use.
  • If you are an independent/small press comic creator, you may use Blambot free fonts in your comic book project–even if you are making money with your project–even if you use the fonts printed on merch in support of your comic. (This excludes Embedding, Webfont, and Redistributive use.) This is Blambot’s way of supporting the independent comic community and applies only to indie/small press comic book creators.
  • If your use does not fall into the above scenarios, and you need a Basic or other license, see the License Options page.

Two of the standouts are:

Back Issues

Back Issues is a handy comic font to get you started. You can play around with it in captions and word balloons.
Back Issues free comic font from Nate Piekos

Badaboom

Badaboom is more of a display font. It would be useful for sound effects, titles or a loud voice word balloon.
Bababoom free comic font from Blambot

But really they’re all great. Other Blambot fonts such as Crime Fighter, Unmasked, and Evil Genius have been around longer than some comic creators have been alive.

While you’re over there be sure to read his post on comic script basics and grammar. It’s worth the trip.

Next up it’s over to 1001fonts.com for two more contenders.

Adam Warren Pro Font Family

Styles: Regular, Bold, Bold Italic

adam warren comic book font by Press Gang Studios

Made by Press Gang Studios

Komika Font Family

free komika comic font family

“The original plan was to have five 10-font packs which would constitute a complete lettering system for the comic artist, whether professional, independent, amateur, beginner or whoever wants to use the stuff. The biggest worry for any comic artist in these digital days, when it comes to letters, is what goes inside the speech, narration and thought balloons. I took care of that with Komika Text, which is based on WBX’s Sunday Komix letters.

Then there are the titles and the cover type, of course. Those are accommodated with Komika Display and Komika Title, based respectively on WBX’s Komixation and Supermarket Sale letters. To add variety and flexibility to the superset, 10 more fonts were added in a Hands set, all of which can theoretically be adequate substitutions for the text, display, and title sets, depending on the application. These supposed “alternative” fonts turned out very nice, and in certain respects are even better than the main sets.”

Then I stopped by Font Squirrel.

Font Squirrel is your best resource for FREE, hand-picked, high-quality, commercial-use fonts. Even if that means, we send you elsewhere to get them.

The Comic category had 26 fonts but only two really jumped out at me. You can head over there and decide for yourself.

VTC Letterer Pro

VTC letterer pro from vigilante typeface corporation

VTC Letterer Pro is brought to us by Vigilante Typeface Corporation aka Larry Yerkes who is a tattoo artist, font designer and freelance Illustrator. This one has been around for a while and I remember downloading it back when I was scouring the net for free fonts.

Zitz

zitz comic font from Harold's Fonts

“ZITZ is my second cartoon font, based on the hand lettering in the King Features daily strip Zits by Jim Borgman and Jerry Scott. According to Robert C. Harvey’s thoughtful Children of the Yellow Kid: The Evolution of the American Comic Strip, “Zits” is a “teenage strip…ostensibly drawn by Borgman and written by Scott…. Borgman produces the final art.” The tall, tight lettering and expressive drawing style of Borgman’s political cartoons has long appealed to me; since 1997, “Zits” has represented a daily dose of his art.

The scratchy outlines of the letters reflect both the artist’s pen and the texture of newsprint. (I saved dozens of strips to get a full font.)
Contains two versions of each capital letter (in the upper and lowercase positions) for a more random look, plus numbers, punctuation, and accented characters.”

My last stop was over to Google Fonts. With hundreds of typefaces to choose from – I finally settled on just one for now. Kalam – a free font that comes in 3 weights.

Kalam

kalam google font created by Lipi Raval and Jonny Pinhorn
“Kalam is a handwriting font family that supports the Devanagari and Latin writing systems. Even though Kalam’s letterforms derive from handwriting, the fonts have each been optimized for text usage on screen. All in all, the typeface is a design that feels very personal. Like many informal handwriting-style fonts, it appears rather fresh and new when seen on screen or printed on the page.
Kalam’s letterforms feature a very steep slant from the top right to the bottom left.

They are similar to letters used in everyday handwriting, and look like they might have been written with either a thin felt-tip pen or a ball-point pen. In the Devanagari letterforms, the knotted-terminals are open, but some other counter forms are closed. Features like these strengthen the feeling that text set in this typeface has been written very quickly, in a rapid manner.
Lipi Raval and Jonny Pinhorn developed the family for ITF; Raval designed the Devanagari component while she and Pinhorn worked together on the Latin.”


Alright – let’s take a brief moment to enjoy this amazing page from Superman Vs. Muhammad Ali (ALL-NEW COLLECTORS’ EDITION #C-56, 1978), lettered by the legendary Gaspar Saladino.

superman vs ali by Dennis O'Neil, Neal Adams and Todd Klein

Image © DC Comics.

Have fun with this, and when you’re ready trust me, you’ll probably start buying fonts from Blambot and Comicraft. I always check out the online sales in the summer (week of Comicon) and New Years over Comicraft.

Be sure to add your favorite fonts in the comments below. It’s always nice to grow a bigger list.


Comic Lettering and Typography Books

DC Comics Guide to Coloring and Lettering Comics

Comic book lettering and coloring by Mark Chiarello and Todd Klein

Acclaimed artists Mark Chiarello and Todd Klein demystify these essential steps in traditional graphic storytelling. Chiarello explains the entire coloring process, from computer and software choice to creating color effects that give the action its maximum impact. Klein discusses whether to letter by hand or by computer—a hotly debated topic among working letterers—and demonstrates an array of techniques for creating word balloons, fonts, logos, and much more.

Comic Book Lettering: The Comicraft Way

64 pages of lettering tips and tricks

Step by Step, Comic Book Lettering the Comicraft Way guides readers through the process of lettering a comic strip digitally. From font design to balloon placement, sound effects, signage, title page and publication design, the creators of The World’s Greatest Comic Book Fonts cover every conceivable aspect of comic book lettering.

Lavishly illustrated by examples drawn from Comicraft’s ten years as America’s premier comic book lettering studio, this manual is an essential tool for comic book creators everywhere.

Lessons in Typography: Must-know typographic principles presented through lessons, exercises, and examples (Creative Core)

Must know typographic principles

In Lessons in Typography, you’ll learn the basics of identifying, choosing, and using typefaces and immediately put that knowledge to work through a collection of exercises designed to deepen and expand your typographic skills.

After a crash course in type terminology, you’re encouraged to walk the talk with lessons and exercises on creating type-based logos, crafting personal emblems, choosing and using the right fonts for layouts, designing your own fonts, fine-tuning text like a professional, hand lettering, and more.

Creative Lettering and Beyond: Inspiring tips, techniques, and ideas for hand lettering your way to beautiful works of art

Inspiring tips, techniques and ideas for hand lettering

Creative Lettering and Beyond combines the artistic talents and inspirational tips and tutorials of several professional hand letterers and calligraphers for a dynamic and interactive learning experience.

After a brief introduction to the various tools and materials, artists and lettering enthusiasts will learn how to master the art of hand lettering and typography through engaging, easy-to-follow step-by-step projects, prompts, and exercises. From the basic shape and form of letters, to cursive script, spacing, and alignment, artists will discover how to transform simple words, phrases, and quotes into beautiful works of hand-lettered art.

Comics and Sequential Art: Principles and Practices

principles and practices from the legendary cartoonist

Will Eisner is one of the twentieth century’s great American artists, a man who pioneered the field of comic arts. Here, in his classic Comics and Sequential Art, he refines the art of graphic storytelling into clear, concise principles that every cartoonist, comic artist, writer, and filmmaker needs to know.

Adapted from Eisner’s landmark course at New York’s School of Visual Arts, Comics and Sequential Art is an essential text filled with invaluable theories and easy-to-use techniques. Eisner reveals here the fundamentals of graphic storytelling. He addresses dialogue, anatomy, framing, and many other important aspects of the art form.

Fully updated and revised to reflect current practices and technology, including a section on digital media, this introduction to the art of comics is as valuable a guide as it was when first published.


Further Watching: Videos

How CAPTAIN AMERICA Demonstrates BRILLIANT Comic Book Lettering!

Lettering is an unsung part of comic books, but a great letterer can impact the story more than you think! Today, we’re taking a look at Captain America: Steve Rogers #3 to see how the positions of speech balloons and caption boxes are critical to the story!

Lettering A Comic Book Page (#Adobe Illustrator)

Lettering a Comic Book Page from SK Comic’s Augmented using Adobe Illustrator.

Lettering & Ballooning

Lettering and ballooning are the easy part! We just need to pick or make our font and jam it onto our page.

Master Penman Jake Weidmann

As the world grows increasingly digital, storied art forms like penmanship are quickly dying out. Old masters pass away, leaving behind a gaping void. Enter Jake Weidmann, the youngest “Master Penman” in the United States by three generations. Weidmann’s work shows an attention to minute detail that only comes through years and years of practice. His finished pieces — which fuse calligraphy and fine art — remind us that handwriting can be beautiful.


Further Reading:

No More Klein Overlays

No More Klein Overlays

Calligraphy guide by Todd Klein

ASK CHRIS #180: LOVE LETTERS

Lettering: who does it best and why?

Comic Book Grammar & Tradition

Comic book lettering has some grammatical and aesthetic traditions that are unique. What follows is a list that every letterer eventually commits to his/her own mental reference file. The majority of these points are established tradition, sprinkled with modern trends and a bit of my own opinion having lettered professionally for a few years now.

10 Greatest Comics Letterers

This article is ancient – but it discusses the masters. The images are broken, and I’d love to see this updated, but I felt it was important to include. You’ll have to ‘Google Image’ examples of each letterer’s works.


Comic Lettering Websites

http://kleinletters.com/

http://clintflickerlettering.blogspot.ca/

http://new.comicraft.com/

The Definitive List of Comic Publisher Submission Guidelines

Manga, and Graphic Novel publishers who accept creator submissions

**[Last Updated: December 5, 2016]

So you want to break into comics but unsure how and who to submit to? You’ve landed on the right page. Here’s the latest update of all of the comic publisher submission guidelines that I could locate.

It’s been almost 18 months since I’ve last updated this list. Sorry about that.

I’ve been busy building a content marketing agency. You might even get a kick out of the analysis I did on the top comic book news sites on the web.

This list has been visited by over 200,000 readers since going live almost seven years ago (on my old publishing site). I hope you can get some use out of it.

The end of 2016 finds the comic industry in an interesting place. June 2016 was comics best selling month since December 1997. It’s nice to see the medium in healthy shape as we near the 2020’s.

Notes

  1. Make sure to click on each company name within the lists to be taken to each submission guidelines page. This way you’ll find out exactly how to submit to each publisher in the method they prefer. I’ve only included a short synopsis for each publisher.
  2. This list only covers print publishers. I reviewed nine months of Diamond Previews catalogs to determine who was still publishing in print and distributing to comic shops and bookstores.
  3. I’ve tried to be as thorough as possible, but there’s a good chance I missed some publishers. Feel free to let me know, and I’ll add them below.
  4. Writers will always have a tougher time breaking into the comics industry. Having said that – there’s always room for good writing, and a lot of publishers will still accept writing submissions. But conventional wisdom says to partner up with an artist if you can. An editor is more likely to read your words if it’s already on a sequential page.
  5. And as always DO YOUR RESEARCH before submitting to a publisher. Search our their sites, social media pages and a do basic Google search. How is their reputation? Does your work fit with their line of books?
  6. And please don’t email me looking for work. I haven’t published a book since 2009, and I don’t have any connections in the industry.

Contents

The BIG 4 Comic Publishers Submission Guidelines

Submission guidelines for the 'big 4' comic publishers

Dark Horse Comics

Writers, Artists, Inkers, Colorists

Dark Horse Comics is the third-largest comics publisher in the U.S., known for such titles as Star Wars, Buffy & Hellboy.

Linked here are individual guideline policies for writers (both prose and comics), artists, inkers, letterers, and colorists.

Dark Horse still welcomes your submissions, and all submissions will still be reviewed, just as they always have been. The only difference is that submissions can no longer be mailed back to the sender.

All unsolicited story/series proposals must have a full creative team on board. Writer-only proposals will not be reviewed.

DC Entertainment

At this time, DC Entertainment does not accept unsolicited artwork or writing submissions.

What Is The DC Entertainment Talent Search?

“Like many creative fields, breaking into the comic book business as an artist can be an exciting but challenging process. It takes proper training, a ton of practice, making the right contacts, learning to sell your talents, building a strong portfolio and much patience. However, time and time again, the best advice we can offer aspiring artists is: Go to a Comics Convention! Comic book conventions offer an ideal forum for meeting working professionals and publishers in the same location. It’s also a great place to get feedback on your portfolio, speak to editors, and ask lots of questions. The only catch is being realistic about the process – not everyone is ready to work in comics.”

Mad Magazine

MAD is actively looking for new talent! They welcome all humor submissions and the best way to know what they’re looking for is to take a look at what they’re doing now! Originality and visual humor are especially prized!

They’re interested in material focusing on evergreen topics, such as dating, family, school and work, plus topical material about celebrities, sports, politics, news and social trends.They also welcome submissions for their Strip Club (artist-writers or artist-writer teams preferred).

They will not consider movie or television satires, rewrites of established MAD premises, your take on existing features, cover ideas, or gags with Alfred E. Neuman.

Image Comics

Image Comics only publishes creator-owned material. They do not contract creators; they’re only interested in publishing original content for which you would retain all rights. Do not submit any work that utilizes already-existing characters—Image characters or otherwise—as they will automatically be declined.

Image Comics publishes creator-owned/creator-generated properties and THEY DON’T PAY PAGE RATES. Image takes a small flat fee off the books published, and it will be the responsibility of the creators to determine the division of the remaining pay between their creative team members.

Artists: Image accepts inking, penciling, lettering, or coloring samples. These will be kept on file, and you may be contacted if and when the occasion presents itself. If your art-only submission is not kept on file, you will not get a response. DO NOT SEND ORIGINAL ART as your work will not be returned.

Writers: They accept proposals only —please do not send storyboards, scripts, notes, or manuscripts—anything other than a proposal that meets the below specifications will be automatically declined.

Top Cow

Pencilers, Inkers, Colorists

For Writers: Unfortunately at this time Top Cow is not accepting unsolicited ideas or scripts from writers.

For Pencilers or Complete Artists: Send 3-6 pages of sequential art. Demonstrate your ability to tell a story using sequential panels and pages. Please use existing Top Cow or other published characters. Samples do not need to be of Top Cow characters.

For Inkers: Send three to six pages of sequential art. They’d need to see the original penciled pages for comparison, so be sure to send them as well.

For Colorists: Send 3 to 6 pages of sequential art. Top Cow would need to see the inked & uncolored pages as well, so be sure to include them with your coloring samples for comparison. Show that you can utilize color to evoke a mood, are conscious of and consistent with lighting, and can clearly separate a scene.

Marvel

“Marvel does not accept or consider any ideas, creative suggestions, artwork, designs, game proposals, scripts, manuscripts, or similar material unless we have specifically requested it from you. Marvel is continuously developing and creating its own ideas and materials, and we don’t have the resources to review or respond to unsolicited material. Unfortunately, any unsolicited material you send will not be read or shared. It will be destroyed, and it will not be returned.

While we can’t accept your unsolicited submissions, please know that Marvel is always looking for new comic book artists and writers. We constantly read and review indie, self-published, creator-owned, and web-comics, review popular online art communities, ask other artists for opinions and recommendations, and host portfolio reviews at conventions from time to time. If you are an aspiring comic book artist or writer, we suggest you publish or publicly post your material, continue to create, and if you have the right stuff…we’ll find you.”

Submission Guidelines for Independent Comic Publishers: Arthouse & Literary

Arthouse Indie Publishers who accept creator submissions

Blank Slate Books

BLANK SLATE BOOKS (WE CAN STILL BE FRIENDS, SPARKY O’HARE) is always interested in working with new authors. They are primarily interested in cartoonists who both write and draw – who, in fact, produce the whole comics work. They aren’t interested in art samples or scripts and outlines. They don’t pair writers with artists. They are interested in both black & white and color work. If you are a new cartoonist, making your work in black & white – thus cheaper to print – will improve your chances of getting a response.

Submit no more than 12 pages if you are sending work as an attachment. Just send them your best work.

Your work can have appeared before as small press, webcomic or self-published, and they may be interested in collecting strip work into a single volume.

Look at the kind of books that Blank Slate have published previously as an indicator of what they might publish in

Drawn & Quarterly

Please send all submissions via low-resolution PDF to submissions@drawnandquarterly.com. We do not respond to all submissions, and we do not read scripts. If you mail us a physical copy, which we strongly discourage, please do so knowing you likely will not hear back from us. Please research what we publish in advance to make sure your comic is well-aligned with Drawn & Quarterly’s existing titles.

Fantagraphics

Submission Questions

Fantagraphics Books (Love & Rockets, Hip Hop Family Tree, Eightball) publishes comics for thinking readers – readers who like to put their minds to work, who have a sophisticated understanding of art and culture, and appreciate personal expression unfettered by uncritical use of cliché. Fantagraphics will practically always reject any submissions that fit neatly into (or combine in a gimmicky fashion) the mainstream genres of superhero, vigilante, horror, fantasy, and science fiction.

Try to develop your own, equally individual voice; originality, aesthetic maturity, and graphic storytelling skill are the signs by which Fantagraphics judges whether or not your submission is ripe for publication.

Fantagraphics does not hire illustrators or pair artists with writers. They are looking for independently-created, publishable work.

They want to see an idea that is fully fleshed-out. Please submit a minimum of five pages of completed art (high-quality reproductions only, please — no original art!). They do NOT look at work submitted in digital format, whether via the internet (email, web, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) or disc.

Iron Circus Comics

Completed Works
What Iron Circus Wants:
Graphic novels. Proposals for graphic novels previously unpublished in print, between 150 and 500 pages in length, aimed at readers 12 years of age and older. Both color and black and white proposals will be considered. All genres, with the exception of superheroes, zombies, and children’s books, will be considered.
Erotic graphic novels. Proposals for erotic graphic novels previously unpublished in print, between 150 and 500 pages in length. Both color and black and white. Erotica submissions will be part of the Smut Peddler Presents line of comics, and Smut Peddler creator and content guidelines will apply to these submissions.
Online comics previously uncollected into print volumes.

What Iron Circus Doesn’t Want

  • Submissions from creators younger than 18 years of age.
  • Monthly serials.
  • Children’s comics.
  • Fan fiction or re-imaginings.
  • Portfolios from colorists, letterers, inkers, pencillers, etc.

Knockabout

They are happy to look at new or old unpublished work. Send a synopsis of the story and 6 to 10 pages of artwork. If you have already self-published a story, they want to see a copy.

NBM

NOTE: NBM are only accepting submissions from already published authors at this time, including ones with proven success in webcomics. They are also not accepting submissions from authors outside of North America, except for adult.

They are interested in general fiction, humor, a satire of fantasy and horror, erotica, mystery. No superheroes.

Nobrow

Nobrow are a publisher, not an illustration agency. You should have a specific type of work collaboration in mind when you submit work to them (i.e., a picture book or perhaps a graphic novel), make sure it is in line with something that they do.

Provide a brief summary and overview of your project. Look at their body of work and think, does what I want to pitch fit in with the Nobrow canon of works?
They have separated the submissions process into three distinct groups.

Category 1: Short-form comics – The 17 x 23 Series: They must be 24 pages beginning to end.

Category 2: Long-form comics/ Graphic Novels: submissions for graphic novels that are 90 pages or more. If you are an illustrator/author or an illustrator and author duo, you should supply a minimum of ten finished pages in the pitch to give them a taste of the ‘look and feel’ of the proposed book.

Northwest Press

Northwest Press is a small publishing house devoted to spotlighting the best in LGBT graphic novels and comics and is focused on encouraging upcoming talent.

Northwest primarily publishes graphic novels and comics and is not currently accepting submissions for prose work.

All the material they publish has strong lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender content. This can either be explicit (stories about situations and struggles tied to the queer experience) or implicit (looking at more general situations through the lens of the queer person).

They can and do publish shorter pieces as digital comics, and are actively seeking new and previously-published work to release digitally.

One Peace Books

One Peace is now accepting submissions. They are looking for work in the following categories: graphic fiction and non-fiction, juvenile fiction, adult trade fiction and non-fiction, how-to, cooking, crafts, and work in translation. However, potential authors and artists are welcome to submit in other categories as well.

Top Shelf Productions

(March, Bacchus, The Underwater Welder) Regarding submissions, they’re easy. Just send them a xerox copy of what you’d like them to look at (or email a link), and enough postage if you want the materials returned to you. Do not attach and send image files to their email addresses.

They cannot accept scripts or plot synopses unless they are accompanied by a minimum of 10-20 completed pages (i.e., fully inked and lettered comic book pages).

Submission Guidelines for Independent Comic Publishers: Genre and Pop

Indie genre comic publishers who accept submissions

2000 AD

So you want to work for 2000 AD? You’ll massively improve your chances of working for their rules.

2000 AD’s submissions period is currently open. It will close again on 1 March 2017.

Artists: They want to see if you can tell a story, not paint an album cover. Send black and white layouts of comic strip work based on the characters of 2000 AD. Only send copies – never originals!
Leave plenty of room for the dialogue and captions in each panel – the more dialogue, the more ‘dead space’ you need to leave. The panels must also flow sequentially – if it isn’t obvious which panel comes next, you’re not doing your job – which is to tell the story.

Writers: If you’ve never had a script published in 2000 AD, start by sending in ideas for one-off, four-page Future Shocks. If and when you’ve proved yourself by writing professional quality one-off stories, you’ll be invited to develop longer series in the future.

215 Ink

Writers, artists
215 Ink currently has open submissions for writers and artist who are looking for a project to work on, as well as complete projects ready to go to print.

The basic guidelines

  • Introduction about yourself and your credentials as well as the creative team on the project.
  • One sentence summing up your story.
  • One page (at most) summary of your story.
  • Completed pages for review.

AAM Markosia

Completed Works, Pencilers, Inkers, Colorists, Letterers

Markosia are now accepting comics submissions for works that have been previously unpublished in the UK. They are interested in Sci-Fi, Fantasy, All-Ages and Historical stories. If you feel your comic doesn’t fit into this, they will still look at all submissions.

They are also now publishing prose novels of all genres, so if you have an unpublished novel or one that you now have the rights back to then please contact Harry at harry@markosia.com

Preference will be given to projects that have all creative team members in place. It can be very time-consuming finding artists, colorists, and letterers for individual scripts.
One submission per team at a time.

Project Submissions
Your printed books need to be at least 40 pages; they will print short form comics electronically, but their focus is on collected editions and long form comics or graphic novels.
Individual Submissions

Markosia are still looking at submissions from writers, artists, colourists and letterers for designated projects.

Writers: they want to see a fully realized script from you. At least a 22-page script. These must be completed in a readable comic format.
Artists (Pencillers/Inkers): Specify whether you want to be considered as a penciler or inker (or both!). They want to see at least five sequential art pages. Preferably from a couple of different stories. Also send over books you have already been published in.
Colourists: 5 pages of sequential work or any concept sketches you’ve worked on. Try to show a variety of work so showcasing as much of your skill base as possible.
Letterers: Send through some examples of your lettering via sequential artwork.
All submissions to be sent by e-mail.

Action Lab Comics

Completed Works
PROJECT SUBMISSIONS
Action Lab requires that project submissions have a complete creative team (writer, artist, and colorist). They don’t pair creators. They publish fully realized, creator owned projects. Please include the following:

  • A title page, including contact information
  • A simple, one-page story synopsis
  • 5-6 pages of sample script
  • 5-6 pages of art

ALL SUBMISSION PACKETS MUST BE IN PDF FORMAT.
PORTFOLIO REVIEW: Action Lab is not currently hiring artists. They will review art submissions, should the opportunity to pair creators arise.

Aftershock Comics

Pencilers, Colorists

Aftershock are currently only accepting submissions from pencilers and colorists.
-Make sure your files are in .jpg or .pdf formats, and make sure the file sizes are a reasonable size so they don’t bounce back
-If you are a penciler, please send sequential art pages (as opposed to cover art)

Alterna Comics

Completed Works

They don’t accept story ideas without accompanying art If you send a pitch/idea without art, the submission will be deleted.

  • No page rates.
  • Submit 8 complete pages. Keep your pitch short.
  • You’ll need to have a creative team attached and ready for a long-term commitment.
  • Creators retain all rights to intellectual, merchandise, film, television, video game, etc.
  • Alterna will only own publishing and distribution rights.
  • Art and story must be of professional quality. This includes all aspects such as lettering,
    coloring, inking, etc. Before you submit, please compare your book’s quality with other
    Alterna titles of similar genre.

Aspen Comics

Pencilers, Inkers, Colorists

Aspen is a small company with high standards and has a (very) few openings for artists in the course of a year. Keep submitting. Send only hard copies (photocopies/print-outs) of your work.

Links to websites/virtual portfolios are acceptable as well. Art samples with their characters preferably, but not necessary. Never send original characters or concepts.
PENCILERS: Submit no less than three pages of consecutive sequential storytelling. Demonstrate as wide a range of skills as possible.

INKERS: Submit no less than three pages of sequential storytelling. Include same-size copies of the original pencils with your samples. Show that you can control gradations through hatching, cross-hatching, texture, and or detail. Exhibit as many different types of textures and line qualities, as you can.

COLORISTS: (*Computer/Photoshop skills are NOT necessary for submitting color work. Feel free to create in whatever media you feel comfortable in.)

Avatar Press

Artists, writers, colorists, completed works

Avatar Press is a leading independent company which publishes a wide variety of comic books and is currently seeking out additional creators – both new and established – in a number of categories:

ARTISTS: Avatar Press is always looking for talented freelance artists, and often has a range of work in a wide variety of subjects and genres available.

If you have a web page or online gallery of your work available, sending Avatar Press editor-in-chief William Christensen a link to that is a good place to start. Your submission should include a wide range of samples, showcasing all your abilities.

They want to see panel to panel continuity (storytelling), as well as illustrative work (pin-ups, covers, etc.) Avatar will consider penciled and inked pages, penciled pages (so long as the pencils are tight and clean), fully-rendered pencils (grayscale tones), and painted pages.

WRITERS: Send an 8-12 page story with panel to panel descriptions and in full script format. The story should feature an adventure by any Avatar Press company-owned character. Do not send stories featuring characters owned by other comic companies or any creator-owned characters.

COLORISTS: Note: Avatar’s digital color needs are currently fulfilled. However, feel free to submit work to be placed on file for any possible future reference, if you so desire.
They are only interested only in hiring digital colorists. If you want to email some small-ish thumbs of your work, that’s fine, but keep the file size reasonable.

CREATOR-OWNED PROJECTS
Avatar Press is always looking for quality creator-owned projects. All genres and styles will be considered. Include an overview of the story, a detailed plot synopsis, sample script pages, character designs, and sample art pages (panel to panel continuity).

Boom Studios

Pencilers, inkers, colorists, letterers

The official submissions forum for prospective artists for BOOM! Studios is located on Facebook.

The Artist Submissions Facebook Page is a place for artists to post samples of their work. This page is strictly for artists, and ALL unsolicited writing submissions will not be reviewed.

Comics Experience Publishing

Completed Works

In alliance with digital distributor comiXology, Comics Experience Publishing offers assistance for new talent to reach a broader audience with their creator-owned work.

Comics Experience Publishing focuses on producing creator-owned titles from new talent associated with C.E. and its online community, the Creators Workshop.

They currently offer a digital publishing model for titles to be distributed through comiXology, the world’s #1 digital comics retailer.

The requirements to submit to the publishing program are:

  1. At least one member of the creative team must be a Creators Workshop member.
  2. That member’s portion of the project must be workshopped within the Creators Workshop.
  3. Creators Workshop members can submit at any time after the above criteria are met.

Committed Comics

Writers, Scripters, Pencilers, Inkers, Colorists, Letterers, Completed Works

Committed Comics is always looking for talented and driven creators.

Writers: Submit no more than a five (5) page story with a clear beginning, middle, and end. DO NOT send in a five-page excerpt of a longer story.

Pencils: submit no less than three (3) pages of a sequential story and no more than five (5).

Inkers: like pencilers – send in three (3) to five (5) pages and one pin-up / cover piece.

Digital Colorists: submission packet must contain the following: Six (6) pieces of sequential work and two (2) cover/pin-up samples.
Letterers: complete the sample pages on their site. Also please include a tear sheet (1-page example) of some of your sound effects and special effects.

Completed Series: You don’t need to have 100% of the book completed but more than a two-page outline. If you are doing a 4 issue mini-series, have at least one fully completed issue with scripts and layouts completed for the remaining three issues.

Creators Edge Press

Complete Works

Project Pitches:
All project pitches should include the following:
1. Cover Letter: Send a short introductory letter (a few paragraphs) that tells us about you and the story you’re submitting.
2. Art: Cover art and at least six pages of penciled and inked sequential pages (colors and lettering optional, but recommended).
3. Story: Please write one page or less story overview.

Dynamite Entertainment

Dynamite Entertainment will not read your submission without a completed and signed Submission Release Agreement.

WRITERS: Please send us an inquiry letter, detailing your writing experience and why you would like to write for D.E. Unsolicited writing samples will not be read. It is their policy to respond to submissions only if we wish to hire the creator.

ARTISTS: Please submit no more than five pages of sample artwork. Please mail in clean 8 1/2″x11″ photocopies of your sample pages and make sure the reproduction quality is high.

PENCILERS: Just send pencils. Do not send inked, colored or lettered pages.

COLORISTS: Don’t send samples colored over your line art. Any flaws in the underlying black and white artwork will influence their opinion of your coloring.

PAINTERS: If you are submitting samples of fully-painted (traditionally or digitally painted) cover work, keep in mind that Dynamite Entertainment covers tend toward iconic shots of single characters rather than groups of characters or storytelling elements.

Hound Comics

Complete works (They do accept penciling, inking, lettering, and coloring samples)

Hound Comics will only publish creator-owned material. Hound will only accept proposals for brand new series or stand-alone graphic novels.

Writers: No script-only submissions. Any script or plotline unaccompanied by art will be unread and discarded. If you are an established professional, please send samples of your published work and they may be able to work something out.

Artists: They accept penciling, inking, lettering, and coloring samples. Art samples will be kept on file and may potentially lead to connecting you with other creators if and when the occasion presents itself.

Submission Guidelines:

  • A one page, synopsis of the overall story.
  • Send (at least 2-3 sequential) fully inked and lettered pages (preferably colored).
  • Hound publishes both full color and black and white books. If you have a colorist and can provide color pages, great!

IDW

Artists and Colorists

No links to blogs or art forums. To ensure your work gets seen, submit lo-res jpegs (72 dpi) to letters@idwpublishing.com. Keep attachments under 10 MB in size.

IDW’s editorial team and they will contact you if any suitable opportunities come up.

Designers and Letterers: IDW does in-house design and lettering, so our needs in these areas are few and far between, but they do occasionally come up.

Lion Forge Comics

Writers, Artists, Concepts

The Lion Forge, LLC (“Lion Forge”) does not regularly accept unsolicited ideas, treatments, concepts, scripts, artworks, or other materials. However, Lion Forge occasionally considers new ideas, formats, or concepts from outside sources.

If you have an idea, treatment, concept, artwork – you may submit such materials to Lion Forge, but only if you first acknowledge and agree to the Lion Forge Submission Policy and Submission Release Agreement.

Please note that if you choose to submit materials, send a link to publicly-posted portfolios. Any submissions in excess of 25 MB will not be accepted, and must be provided by sending a link.

You won’t always get an immediate response, but our editors DO look at everything that comes through the portal.

Red Giant Entertainment

Writers, Pencilers, Inkers, Colorists

Red Giant Entertainment, Inc., is an Intellectual Property development transmedia company.

Unless they specifically ask you to snail-mail something to them — a printed book, a flash drive, bribes — submit your work to submissions@redgiantentertainment.com. We’re well into the 21st Century, and our creators around the world send files digitally.

When submitting .jpgs by Email, LABEL YOUR FILES PROPERLY.

DO NOT send links instead of your samples, although it is OK to include links IN ADDITION TO your samples.

Include a COVER LETTER. Your name, your address, your credits if any, what you’re submitting, and why.

Before you send anything — concept or story or art or lettering or covers — download, fill out, and sign the RED GIANT SUBMISSION FORM.

Red Giant does not review any unsolicited story concepts, ideas, proposals, or scripts for properties they already publish, or any property not owned by the person/agent submitting it.

DO NOT SEND UNSOLICITED STORY SUBMISSIONS. They will be deleted.

WRITERS: Please send us an Email outlining your writing accomplishments/experience and why you hope to write for Red Giant Entertainment.
ARTISTS: Five to 10 pages of sample artwork is plenty.
PENCILERS: If you pencil, just send pencils of your sequential pages. Don’t send inks, letters, or colors if you’re trying to sell your pencilling skills.
INKERS: Submit .jpgs of the pencils you inked as well as the inks, for comparison purposes. It’s best to show inks over more than one professional penciller.
COLORISTS: Send us sequential samples over PROFESSIONAL artwork.
COVER PAINTERS: traditional and digital painters are welcome.

SCAR Comics

Creator-Owned Projects

Scar Comics are always on the look out for original stories from talented creators, who wish to get their book published, but have not been picked up by other publishers, or can’t afford to publish their books.

They pay for the printing and marketing of the book. You provide a completed graphic novel.

Do not send any superhero stories, or scripts without any artwork as they only accept projects with an artist attached. If you are an editor submitting an Anthology send samples of each story.

Your pitch should consist of the following:

  •  6 – 10 pages of complete artwork from your book 72dpi, full size
  •  A full story outline including the concept in a sentence, beginning, middle and end
  •  Details of any main characters key to the story (optional)
  •  Full details of your final page count and format

Timebomb Comics

Time Bomb Comics wants to publish a wide variety of comics from a wide variety of genres – science-fiction, thriller, mystery, romance, horror, superhero, adventure – and are looking to work with committed writers and artists

No Viz–style humor strips, parodies of existing works and sex comics.

WRITERS: send a fully scripted short story of no more than five finished comic pages. It can be in any genre, but your story must have a beginning, middle and end. If you have an example of work you´ve already completed or had published elsewhere then by all means send that as your sample.

ARTISTS: Submit no more than five pages of sequential storytelling in any genre which demonstrates your understanding of the comics format. Send work you´ve already completed or had published elsewhere as your sample if you wish.

COLOURISTS/LETTERERS/ETC.
Contact them to find out if there are any current opportunities.

*Note for all submissions*

  • Samples must be sent as separate attachments
  • NO links to online portfolios (or sites such as Deviantart)

Their guidelines are pretty clear and while they like to hear from new talent any submissions not following the guidelines (regarding how samples are sent) will not be considered.
submissions@timebombcomics.com

Valiant Entertainment

Artists and writers may submit portfolios and previously published work to submissions@valiantentertainment.com

Submission Guidelines for Manga Publishers

Manga publishers who accept submissions

Antarctic Press

Artists, writers

Artists: ONE COMPLETE ISSUE (22-30 pages) of rendered (penciled, inked) SEQUENTIAL art via photocopies. They look for a MANGA/ANIME style of artwork, that many of their creators employ. Examples of published work could be used if applicable.

If you wish to submit your own original series, start with a one-shot or a 3- to 4-issue mini-series.

Writers:

  1. 1- to 4-page typed STORY SYNOPSIS and/or TREATMENTS. If they like your idea, they’ll request a script from you.
  2. A typed cover sheet of the overview of your story. Example: How many issues the story will be and how many pages per issues. 1- to 4-issue mini-series are preferred over ongoing series. Stories that are finite encourage the retailer to give your new comic a chance.
  3. Published work that you’ve done if applicable.

eManga

For Individual Creators:

They are looking for up and coming creatives. They are looking to publish original manga, comics, novels, light novels, novellas, illustrated works, games, magazines, fiction, journals, memoirs, thesis, collected opinion pieces, commentary, literary biographies, foreign language publications, textbooks, and any type of creative work that you wish to share with the world.

Work submitted should be completed work, no project proposal, incomplete works, or pitches accepted.

Submit sample images or links to the work you wish to be reviewed.

eManga can also work with you to distribute your work on a variety of different platforms and marketplaces.

Sweatdrop

Sweatdrop is not an employer but a group of artists who print and sell their work under the brand. All print runs are paid for by the individual creators, excepting anthologies; the group does NOT cover individual printing cost. It provides a platform for creators to self-publish their own stories and sell them online and at events.

Sweatdrop is always happy to consider new members!
You need to:

  • Live in the UK
  • Create original comics
  • Have one completed comic, to a high standard, ready to print

Magazines and Anthologies

comic magazines and anthologies who accept creator submissions

Heavy Metal

Complete works

HEAVY METAL is always searching for cool science fiction, fantasy, and horror comics

COMICS FOR HEAVY METAL MAGAZINE
They’re only seeking completed stories (preferably in full color since most of the magazine features color stories).
They do not pair writers with artists.

Stories can be as short as one page or as long as 96 pages (and now and then, even longer). They’re mainly looking for short stories from 8 to 16 pages in length, but they do print one-pagers, longer pieces and serialize graphic novels over several issues.

NO SNAIL MAIL SUBMISSIONS – all submissions must be submitted via e-mail.

COVER ART FOR HEAVY METAL MAGAZINE
Heavy Metal publishes six issues per year, and if you’d like to submit work to be considered for a cover, it’s pretty much the same process as for comics. Please do not send links to websites/blogs/social media accounts because they don’t have time to surf sites

ILLUSTRATION FOR HEAVY METAL MAGAZINE
They don’t commission single illos – but they do have the “Gallery” and “Artist’s Studio” sections in the magazine that spotlight an illustrator by featuring 6 to 15 pieces of artwork and a short biography of the artist. There isn’t a page rate for them, so they’re for promotional purposes only.

COMIC BOOK SERIES PROPOSALS FOR OUR COMIC BOOK LINE
Comic book series proposals must have at least eight pages of final art included with the pitch material so they can see what the finished comic book pages will look like. Beyond that requirement, please feel free to include as much additional material as you wish.

Starburst Magazine

Are you a creator of comics? Would you like to see your work in the pages of STARBURST MAGAZINE?

They are dedicated to helping fresh and exciting talent be seen by a wider audience and have opened their submissions window for creators of sequential art.

For now they just want completed strips of one or two pages in length.
Science fiction, horror and fantasy themed work stands a significantly better chance of getting published. No zombies.

To submit your work, please email Ed Fortune on: showcasestrips@starburstmagazine.com

Submissions must not have been printed or published elsewhere, and you must own the rights to the work.

Work spec should be:

  • 180mm(w) x 245mm(h)
  • CMYK
  • Min 300dpi
  • .jpg or .png format

Please do not send files directly, use a file hosting service (such as dropbox) instead.

Comic Submission Guidelines for Book Publishers

Book Publishers who accept creator submissions

Literary Agents Who Represent Graphic Novels

Niki Smith has curated a list of literary agents who represent graphic novels and comics. Every agency on this list has mentioned an interest in graphic novels either on their website or their blog or made a GN sale– no second-hand info unless it was well vouched for.

Arthur A Levine Books

Arthur A. Levine Books do not accept unsolicited novel-length manuscripts outright.

They do look at the following materials:

  • Picture Books: Query letter + the full text
  • Novels: Query letter + the first two chapters + synopsis
  • Other: Query letter + 10-page sample + synopsis/proposal
  • Illustration: Three sample illustrations and/or links to online portfolios

They look for strong writing, beautiful artwork, authentic emotion, and ideas or perspectives they haven’t seen before, and enjoy working with debut authors and illustrators.

With the exception of picture book dummies (see below), all submissions are reviewed online through Submittable.

If you are met with the message “There are presently no open calls for submissions,” we have reached our monthly limit on queries. Please wait until the first day of the next month to submit your query.

If you are submitting a picture book dummy (full text and illustrations), it may be sent to them through the mail. (This is the only kind of query that will be accepted through the mail.)

Groundwood Submissions

PICTURE BOOKS:
Due to the large number of submissions we receive, Groundwood regrets that we cannot accept unsolicited manuscripts for picture books.

NOVEL-LENGTH FICTION:
We are always looking for new authors of novel-length fiction for children of all ages. Their mandate is to publish high-quality, character-driven literary fiction. They do not publish stories with an obvious moral or message, or genre fiction such as thrillers or fantasy.
Please submit no more than one manuscript at a time.

ART GUIDELINES:
Groundwood Books is looking for Canadian illustrators to interpret the words of some of Canada’s finest children’s writers. Their emphasis is on stories of real children in convincing situations and milieus, both contemporary and historical, for all ages from infants to teens. Art may be realistic or abstracted and stylized to any degree, but conventional cartoon and animation styles are not needed.

Nonfiction illustrators are also needed: scientific drawing in natural history and other fields, and historical reconstruction are among the areas we are interested in.

As well, they need cover artists for a wide range of fiction from early readers to young adult.

You may also send digital samples (PDFs, JPEGs, TIFFs) as e-mail attachments.

They also accept physical samples by mail as specified below:

  • 4 to 10 black-and-white or color copies or digital color proofs
  • 4 to 10 tear sheets, press sheets, postcards
  • 1 to 2 published, bound books or sets of folded and gathered sheets

Kids Can Press Illustrator Guidelines

Kids Can Press are interested in and look forward to seeing illustrations of all kinds. Every book is unique, and they never know what they’ll need regarding illustration style.
Send us an email with your contact information and a link to your website or portfolio. Attach only one or two low-resolution JPEGs that best represent your work.

Lerner Publishing Group

Lerner Publishing Group works with many talented authors and illustrators to create its books for children and young adults.

Illustrators: They accept resumes and portfolio samples from children’s book illustrators. Photographers: They accept resumes and portfolio samples from photographers who have content appropriate for children’s books.

Authors of books for Jewish children and families: Their Kar-Ben Publishing imprint does accept unsolicited manuscripts for Jewish-themed children’s books.

Fiction and picture book authors: They don’t accept unsolicited manuscripts from authors. Occasionally, we may put out a call for submissions, which will be announced on their blog.

O’Brien Press

O’Brien Press Manuscript Submission Guidelines

The O’Brien Press are committed to new and developing talent, and encourage any aspiring authors to send their writing in.

However, please note the following:

They publish mainly children’s fiction, children’s non-fiction, and adult non-fiction. They do not publish poetry, academic works or adult fiction.

Should your submission be 1000 words or less then you may submit your work in its entirety. Please number all the pages of your submission appropriately. For anything more than this length — for example, a children’s novel — a synopsis and 2 or 3 sample chapters is more than adequate.

Penguin Publishing

Donald A. Wollheim (DAW) Books are strongly committed to discovering and nurturing new talent, and to keeping a personal “family” spirit at DAW—something they feel is all too rare in today’s world of international conglomerate publishing.

Submission Guidelines
DAW accepts unsolicited submissions of science fiction and fantasy novels. No short stories, short story collections, novellas, or poetry. The average length of the novels they publish is almost never fewer than 80,000 words.

A literary agent is not required for submission. NO manuscripts that are currently on submission to another publisher unless prior arrangements have been made with a literary agent.

No electronic submissions of any kind. Send us the entire manuscript with a cover letter.

Seven Stories

An independent press publishing works of literature and nonfiction by voices of conscience.
Books for Progressive Children, Baby Radicals, and Curious Kids of All Stripes

Manuscript submissions, accompanied by a cover letter and two sample chapters only, with a 46-cent SASE or postcard for reply.

Sterling Publishing

No electronic submissions.

Adult and Young Adult Books

At present, the Sterling list is composed of a broad range of subject areas including current events, diet and health, parenting, pop culture, reference, history, art and artists, music, and everything in between.

Children’s Books
Sterling Children’s Books publishes both fiction and non-fiction, including the classics, picture books, joke books, and novelty formats, as well as books for babies and toddlers. FlashKids imprint publishes workbooks and flash cards for preschool, elementary, and middle school students in essential curriculum areas such as reading, math, writing, test preparation, and much more.

Submissions Guidelines
Please write to us explaining your idea and enclose an outline and a sample chapter of the proposed book (typed and double-spaced, please) along with sample illustrations where applicable. For Children’s books, please submit full manuscripts. No electronic (e-mail) submissions. Be sure to include information about yourself with particular regard to your skills and qualifications in the subject area of your submission.

Titan Books

NON-FICTION ART & COMICS REFERENCE
They are looking for strong proposals for these titles, preferably creator or character-led. They prefer writers who have a proven track record in this area, and good contacts in the art & comics world. They are also interested to hear from writers who would be interested in working on licensed publications they have already contracted.

COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS
The majority of Titan’s graphic novel titles are licensed from overseas publishers or acquired through agents. They do publish a growing number of originated graphic novels. They run portfolio sessions at comic conventions where your work may be reviewed. They are interested to hear from writers and artists who would be interested in working on licensed projects they have already contracted.

TwoMorrows Publishing

If you have an idea for a book you’d like TwoMorrows to consider publishing, please e-mail publisher John Morrow at twomorrow@aol.com

To help them better evaluate your idea, send a 1000 word (or less) proposal, including a detailed description and highlights of the project, who you see as the main audience for it, and a breakdown of the chapters of the book.

For details on submitting art and articles for their magazines, please contact each of their editors directly for the submission requirements:

Comic and Cartoon Syndicate Submission Guidelines

Cartoon and newspaper syndicates who accept artist submissions

Creators, Inc

Creators, Inc. distributes a great variety of continuing features, such as comic strips and panels, columns and political cartoons, as well as books and original manuscripts. They are constantly on the lookout for quality features. The potential distribution for your work includes virtually every American newspaper that buys syndicated material, as well as other national and international publications.

Since 2015, Creators only accepts submissions digitally. All hard-copy submissions will be returned to the sender without being opened, read or considered in any way.

They like to develop a personal relationship with the artists and writers they syndicate – include some information about yourself with your submission (resumes are fine). While having been published before is, of course, a great recommendation, good writing, and cartooning stand on their own, and your material will be considered whether you have a cabinet full of clips or not.

King Features

King Features is always happy to look at new comic features for possible syndication. They believe in the art of cartooning and place great importance on looking at new material. They carefully consider every comic strip or panel idea submitted.

Your total submission package should include:

  • A cover letter — that briefly outlines the overall nature of your comic strip.
  • 24 daily comic strips — on 8-1/2″ x 11″ paper (you can fit up to 3 or 4 strips per page).
  • A character sheet — that shows your major characters (if any) along with their names and a paragraph description of each.
  • No submissions via email.

WHAT DO KING FEATURES LOOK FOR IN A SUBMISSION?
“We are looking for comic features that will simultaneously appeal to the editors who buy comics and the readers whose interest the comics must sustain for years to follow. We don’t have a formula for telling us which comics will do that, but we do look for some elements that we believe people respond to.

First, we look for a uniqueness that reflects the cartoonist’s individual slant on the world and humor. If we see that unique slant, we look to see if the cartoonist is turning his or her attention to events that other people can relate to.

Second, we very carefully study a cartoonist’s writing ability. Good writing helps weak art, better than good art helps weak writing. Good art is also important. It is what first attracts readers to a comic strip. We look to see that your art is drawn clearly and with visual impact. We want our comics to be noticed on a page.

Finally, we look for your ability to sustain a high level of quality material. We want comics that readers will enjoy for years and years.”

Tribune Content Agency

Tribune Content Agency accepts electronic-only submissions for columns, commentary, comics, editorial cartoons, puzzles and other content, including high-profile digital ventures and multimedia offerings.

They are looking for well-established brand names and talent with a history of strong audience appeal. Referrals from established contacts or agents are preferred. They approve and take to market only a small fraction of the content they receive.

Universal Uclick

Universal Uclick is always looking for great new comics and columns.

Submission Guide for Comics
-4 to 6 weeks of samples of a proposed feature
-A letter explaining the purpose and scope of your material.

Washington Post

Submit a Cartoon
To submit your editorial cartoons or comic strip/panel for consideration, please provide at least 24 cartoons in one multi-page PDF document, with at least two dailies on each page.
Email your submission to cartoonsubmission@washpost.com

Further Reading

Resources: How To Break Into Comics and Survive Once You’re There

A constantly updated list of resources for creators in all ends of the business, from the mechanics of pitching to the psychology or surviving, how to exhibit at shows, crowdfunding basics and more.

43 Pen and Ink Artists You Should Follow on Instagram

pen and ink artists

And maybe it’s time you got your own work up on there as well.

When it comes to social networks these days you won’t get much better bang for your buck than Instagram. Especially if you’re a pen and ink artist (or any type of artist for that matter).

And if you do happen to be an artist – there’s nothing like the daily inspiration of a well curated Instagram feed. A non-stop barrage of amazing artwork for your eye holes to take in 24/7.

I’m always on the hunt for awesome artwork and artists – to keep my motivation running high. And do we ever have that in the list of creators below here.

I find the signal to noise ratio is a lot better on Instagram versus Facebook. While it’s nice to keep up with friends and current events on Facebook you also have to wade through a lot of outrage porn and clickbait articles.

On Instagram we get sharks!

According to an analysis done by Forrester, brands achieved  58 times more engagement on Instagram per follower than Facebook and 120 times more engagement per follower than Twitter.

So if you’re looking to get more more exposure on the web for your visual creations…

Get your shit up on Instagram.

From putting in a bit more of a concentrated effort on the network myself – I’ve come away pretty impressed with the results. The size of the creative community (and sub communities) on Instagram is vast and a little overwhelming at first. But you’ll quickly settle in.

So without further ado – here’s the most badass group of artists that I could find demonstrating mastery of pen and ink on Instagram.

Please add anyone that I’ve missed in the comments below.

Aaron Horkey

I’d put Aaron in the top 10 (maybe top 3) pen and ink illustrator / artists working on the planet today. He makes everyone want to pack up and go home. He’s that good. Enjoy!

Ashley Wood

If you’re like me – you’ve been following Ash for damn near 2 decades. Now we can follow him on Instagram.

Becky Cloonan

 Becky was one of the first artists that I ever interviewed. Good to see she’s even better now. 

“You bred raptors…?” My piece for the @mondotees gallery show “When Dinosaurs Ruled The Earth”! A photo posted by Becky Cloonan (@beckycloonan) on

Chris Riddell

Cash book sketchbook.

A photo posted by Chris Riddell (@chris_riddell) on

Chris Samnee

Chris captures the spirit and essence of Marvel and DC characters with his accomplished minimalist approach.  

Been thinking that it was Monday all day today– nope, still the weekend. ???? A photo posted by Chris Samnee (@chrissamnee) on

Dan Fraga

I’ve been admiring Dan’s work since the early days of Image.

Daily Sketch: 211 of 365. Blown

A photo posted by Dan Fraga (@couchdoodles) on

Dave Rapoza

 Killer figure work from Dave. 

24 hour auction for my original Wolverine inks! www.ebay.com/itm/-/221838872333 #xmen #wolverine #inks #original A photo posted by Dave Rapoza (@daverapoza) on

DZO

Simply jaw-dropping detail in his work. Master of multiple mediums.

Eric Canete

25 years on and I still love Eric’s work as much as the first day I laid eyes upon it.  

05.04.13 A photo posted by Eric Canete (@ericcanete) on

Fiona Staples

She doesn’t post extremely often on Instagram, but when she does…

I’m watching season 5 of Misfits, so here’s Rudy’s precious face.

A photo posted by Fiona Staples (@fionastaples) on

Florian Bertmer

I own several prints done by Florian. His work never fails to impress.  

WIP #amidemon #notofthisworld #coliseum #doomriders #danzig #florianbertmer #bertmer #art #illustration A photo posted by Florian Bertmer (@florianbertmer) on

Francis Manapul

Always cool to see his work show up in my feed. I’ve been digging his recent experiments playing around with various art styles.

Up close on #wonderwoman #justiceleague #godsandmen

A photo posted by Francis Manapul (@francis_manapul) on

Greg Tocchini

 Greg’s work has always felt alive. His innovative panel to panel sequences make my eyes happy! 

LOW … A photo posted by Greg Tocchini (@gregtocchini) on

J Scott Campbell

Unmistakable style.

Jae Lee

Every new Jae Lee piece that shows up on here is a gift for my peepers. I can never get enough.

#hulk #marvel #montrealcomiccon #commission A photo posted by Jae Lee and June Chung (@jaeleeart) on

Screw it – I’m posting a second image by Jae Lee…

Just head on over to his page and soak it all in.

#spiderman #sinistersix #greengoblin #venom #marvel #commission #jaelee

A photo posted by Jae Lee and June Chung (@jaeleeart) on

Jamie McKelvie

 Those warm up sketches… 

Kusanagi warm up sketch. A photo posted by Jamie McKelvie (@mckelvie) on

Jason shawn Alexander

Sweet Jesus! Now this is what I’m talking about.

Jeffrey Alan Love

 His various styles are more off the beaten path. And I appreciate all of them.

Jeremy Sorrell

Again – Jeremy has built up a legion of fans with his incredible off-kilter renderings.

my attempt at channeling some @jasonshawnalex and @kentwms inspiration

A photo posted by Jeremy Sorrell (@jeremysorrell) on

Jim Lee

Jim doesn’t play fair. He just toys with us. And after all of these years he’s still kicking ass and taking names.

Final scan #Batman1966 #dccomics #muse ???? A photo posted by Jim Lee (@jimleeart) on

Jim Mahfood

I had to scroll waaaaay down on Jim’s feed to find this drawing of ROM Spaceknight. His profile is one of the best (and most insane) ones out there on Instagram. He posts often and it’s always worth it.

Here’s more Mahfood. Simply awesome!

Seriously – go check out his page.

Jock

Jock’s sketches are a thing of beauty. I’m glad he keeps posting them on Instagram. You will be as well.

DKR sketch #SDCC

A photo posted by Jock (@jock4twenty) on

John Dyer Baizley

 If Pushead handed the torch off to any artist – it’s JDB. One of the most accomplished pen and ink artists in the game. 

Tomorrow @ brlsq. #coliseum. A photo posted by John Dyer Baizley (@aperfectmonster) on

John Welding

John has a playful old-school style that takes me to the happy days of ‘way back’.

#WatertonComic Page 10 Panel inking details.

A photo posted by John Welding (@johnweldingillustrator) on

Juan Francisco Casas

Juan draws mostly beautiful (and mostly nude) women in large format illustrations with blue ball point pens.

Kim Jung Gi US

Kim does more artwork in a week than most artists pull off in months. He draws big. He draws fast. And you’ll cry when you see how good it is.

KJG’s original drawing for sale! #SDCC #booth5005 #kimjunggi

A photo posted by Kim Jung Gi US (@kimjunggius) on

Lucas Ruggieri

Holy shit!

Finally finishing up the first layer of ink on this, looking forward to starting the second. #lucasruggieri #lrillustration A photo posted by Lucas Ruggieri (@lr_illustration) on

Mahmud Asrar

I was not previously familiar with Mahmud’s work. A Twitter friend suggested I take look. Glad they did!

Antlers – My new banner image for conventions #antlers #girl #art #illustration

A photo posted by Mahmud Asrar (@mahmudasrar) on

Marcio Takara

 Another artist who works primarily for the ‘big two’ and is worth your time.

#ArmorWars #SecretWars A photo posted by Marcio Takara (@marciotakara) on

Mark W. Richards

Mark of Heavy Hand Illustration seems to never stop creating and I hope he never does.

Michael Oeming

The one and only.   

#superman A photo posted by @oeming on

Mike Sutfin

Mike’s work is so good – it hurts.

Ming Doyle

I was worried we’d lose Ming completely to the ‘illustration world’ – because damn! – her comic renderings keep getting better.  

#BostonComicCon sketch, #BatmanReturns #Catwoman! #hashtags A photo posted by Ming Doyle (@mingdoyle) on

Pushead

You know who’s a better artist than Pushead? No one.

Rafael Grampá

 The first time I was introduced to Rafael’s art I thought to myself, ‘1. Holy crap! 2. This guy came swinging out of the gates with a wholly original style. 3. I hope he can keep doing this for decades.’ 

Batgirl. #Comission #Batman #rafaelgrampa A photo posted by Rafael Grampá (@rafael_grampa) on

Rich Kelly

Rich is another very talented and distinct voice in illustration.

#tbt working out an eventual cover for @bicycletimes magazine.

A photo posted by Rich Kelly (@therichkelly) on

Richey Beckett

 I only discovered Richey’s art in 2015 – but if he keeps this up he’ll soon be in charge of the ‘illustration and poster’ cartel.

Pen and ink detail, part of a very exciting new project.. More soon..???? #richeybeckett #penandink A photo posted by Richey Beckett (@richeybeckett) on

Ryan Benjamin

Just straight up awesome!

Batman commission

A photo posted by ryan benjamin (@ryanbnjmn) on

Ryan Ottley

I had seen Ryan’s sketches and drawings periodically on Facebook – but holy hell it’s amazing seeing them all in one place!  

My first sketchbook cover. Violence and piggybacks. Her name is Unicorn Girl. And she kills stuff. A photo posted by Ryan Ottley (@ryanottley) on

Simon Kercz

Simon’s work is often not for the faint of heart – but it’s all rendered with undeniable skill.

Having some Sunday fun playing with some deleted halftone sheets I got. #drawing #punks #skunked

A photo posted by Simon Kercz (@simonyetikercz) on

Skottie Young

 I haven’t had enough of Skottie’s work in my diet lately. Time to fix that. 

Almost halfway #4pager #giantsizelittlemarvel #wip A photo posted by skottie young (@skottieyoung) on

Tula Lotay

Amazing travel photos mixed in with amazing artwork. A life well lived!

Rebels #5 sketch

A photo posted by Tula Lotay (@tulalotay) on

Yuko Shimizu

 There’s only one Yuko. Her style is unmistakable and she works every inch of the page. We’re lucky she shares her process with us every step of the way.  

???????????????? A photo posted by Yuko Shimizu (@yukoart) on

 

Nope – one image isn’t going to cut it. Here’s more Yuko!

Me tired.

A photo posted by Yuko Shimizu (@yukoart) on

And if you’re so inclined you can follow me as well…

 I’ve been using my Instagram page specifically for GoPro photography and pen and ink drawings. Felt good to ditch the cell phone photos and play around in two different mediums. 

Fun with a Pilot big blue, a 2-dollar brush and a razor blade. #penandink #madmax #illustration #furyroad A photo posted by Jason Thibault (@jay_thibs) on

Editorial Guidelines for this Blog

It’s been a long time since I’ve built a platform where I could use my own voice on the internet. Maybe as far back as MySpace in the mid 2000’s.

So in the spirit of building a site that I myself would want to keep returning to I’ve laid out some ground rules that I’ll need to follow.

#1: No lazy posts or meaningless horseshit. I’ll either endeavor to do deep dives into subjects or provide long exhaustive (and well researched) lists so that you can do your own deep dives. Similar to what we tried to do on OptimumWound.com up until 2010 where mega thousand+ word interviews and articles were the norm. There’s plenty of other sites that post 5-20 times a day and you know where to find them. I will try to maintain a twice a month posting frequency on here.

#2: I’ll curate a post once a month with all of the amazing and useful items that I come across during the previous 30 days. I’ll try to keep it to 15 items or less and filter out the pointless and irrelevant.

#3: I’ll keep the tone lighter and more authentic on here so we can have positive and productive conversations in the comments. I do miss all of the thousands of creatives that I used to routinely talk to when I was running my micro comics publishing biz. I also welcome healthy discussion and thoughtful counter arguments. Trolling and negativity however will have no place on here.

#4: This site will primarily be a way to write about and talk to creatives of all shapes and sizes. Self-publishing (both books and comics) will come up often, but so will film and other media. We’re all trying to carve out our own path and we all have a lot to learn from each other. When I launched (and eventually walked away from) my publishing company in the late 2000’s I was attempting to model it after successful indie record labels. I succeeded wildly in some aspects and failed miserably in others. But I’ll eventually put those lessons that I’ve taken from that amazing experience into words on here. And what I would have done differently.

#5: This list will be subject to revisions and additions but for now I’m cool with it.

-Jay